Drug and mental health admissions highest for a decade

  • Official figures reveal 15,074 cases of people in hospital with illicit drug poisoning in 2015-16, 51% more than 2005-06.
  • Mental health issues had drugs as a cause in 81,904 cases.
  • Public health experts say falling investment in drug treatment services may explain the rise.
  • The 2015-16 figures revealed Blackpool had the highest rate of people admitted to hospital because of poisoning by illicit drugs.
  • Ed Morrow, drugs policy lead at the Royal Society for Public Health, said part of the explanation for the rise in admissions “may be the disinvestment in drug treatment services that has taken place alongside wider cuts to public health in recent years”.

One in 12 people aged 16 to 59 in England had taken an illicit drug in the last year.
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Sandy Saunders: WW2 ‘Guinea Pig’ pilot dies from cancer

Sandy Saunders: WW2 'Guinea pig' pilot dies from cancer

  • Dr Sandy Saunders, who was badly burnt in a RAF crash in 1945, died on Sunday.
  • The 94-year-old, from Leicestershire, along with other wounded veterans were given experimental skin grafts – they were dubbed the Guinea Pig Club.
  • The veteran, who was one of 17 surviving members of the Guinea Pig Club, organised tribute to the 649 members.
  • Dr Saunders was inspired to become a GP by Sir Archibald and worked as a doctor in Nottingham for 40 years.
  • Director and actor Simon Callow, who is directing a play about the Guinea Pig Club, said he had the “extraordinary pleasure” of meeting the “inspiring” man in 2015.

Sandy Saunders was among the first airmen given experimental skin grafts in the 1940s after being badly burnt.
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Colon Cancer’s Up Among Gen Xers And Millennials, But Scientists Say Reasons Are Elusive : Shots

Via @NPR: Why Are More Young Americans Getting #ColonCancer?

  • More than a decade ago, scientists noticed an odd quirk in the data: While overall rates of colorectal cancer have been falling dramatically since the mid-1980s, there’s been a steady uptick of this disease among people younger than 50.
  • And the vast majority of colorectal cancer cases are among people over 50: These older Americans are 16 times more likely to get colon cancer, compared with adults who are younger.
  • A large British study published a few years ago suggested that only 11 percent of colon cancer cases could be tied to trends in obesity.
  • Some people are getting colonoscopies for reasons other than cancer screening these days, and doctors are surely coming upon early cases of colon cancer they might not have turned up so soon.
  • Another point of agreement: If the Trump administration eliminates the current insurance benefit for colon cancer screening as it does away with the Affordable Care Act, fewer people are likely to get screened for this deadly malignancy.

Data suggests that the rate of colon cancer among people under 50 is on the rise, but there are lots of possible explanations for that. Scientists say teasing out the truth will be tricky.
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Pregnancy Upon Pregnancy

hahahaha being a woman is great!!!!

  • It is possible for a second fertilization to occur when one pregnancy is already progressing.
  • The condition is called superfetation, and while it is fairly often seen in mammals, including cats, only a few case studies have been reported in humans.
  • A French report of one apparent case, published in 2008 in The European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.said that a review of the scientific literature had found fewer than 10 such reports up to that time.
  • “Superfetation is defined by the fertilization and the implantation of a second oocyte in a uterus already containing the product of a previous conception,” the report said.
  • Ordinarily, the release of eggs ceases once a woman is pregnant, and the hormonal and physical changes of pregnancy work together to prevent another conception.

A. It is possible for a second fertilization to occur when one pregnancy is already progressing. The condition is called superfetation, and while it is fairly often seen in mammals, including cats, only a few case studies have been reported in humans.
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Colon Cancer’s Up Among Gen Xers And Millennials, But Scientists Say Reasons Are Elusive : Shots

  • More than a decade ago, scientists noticed an odd quirk in the data: While overall rates of colorectal cancer have been falling dramatically since the mid-1980s, there’s been a steady uptick of this disease among people younger than 50.
  • And the vast majority of colorectal cancer cases are among people over 50: These older Americans are 16 times more likely to get colon cancer, compared with adults who are younger.
  • A large British study published a few years ago suggested that only 11 percent of colon cancer cases could be tied to trends in obesity.
  • Some people are getting colonoscopies for reasons other than cancer screening these days, and doctors are surely coming upon early cases of colon cancer they might not have turned up so soon.
  • Another point of agreement: If the Trump administration eliminates the current insurance benefit for colon cancer screening as it does away with the Affordable Care Act, fewer people are likely to get screened for this deadly malignancy.

Data suggests that the rate of colon cancer among people under 50 is on the rise, but there are lots of possible explanations for that. Scientists say teasing out the truth will be tricky.
Continue reading “Colon Cancer’s Up Among Gen Xers And Millennials, But Scientists Say Reasons Are Elusive : Shots”

Bright like a diamond: Harvard honors Rihanna’s philanthropy

  • CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Harvard University thinks Rihanna shines bright like a diamond when it comes to philanthropy.
  • The Grammy Award-winning singer is being honored Tuesday as Harvard’s 2017 Humanitarian of the Year.
  • The university says it chose Rihanna for her involvement in a number of charitable causes.
  • She also created the Clara Lionel Foundation scholarship program — named for her grandparents — for students from the Caribbean who attend college in the U.S.
    Rihanna also supports the Global Partnership for Education and Global Citizen Project, providing children with access to education in more than 60 developing countries.


CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Harvard University thinks Rihanna shines bright like a diamond when it comes to philanthropy.
The Grammy Award-winning singer is being honore
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‘Taliban infiltrator’ aids police killing in Helmand province

  • A police source told the BBC that an infiltrator from the Taliban had allowed militants into the police station in the regional capital of Lashkar Gah last night.
  • Lashkar Gah has come under increased pressure from the Taliban in recent months.
  • The city of 200,000 people is seen as strategically important, and the key to holding Helmand province.
  • Thousands of people fled the rural areas to shelter in Lashkar Gah last August, before the city itself came under attack in October.
  • The city was previously the scene of heavy fighting between the Taliban and Nato-led forces before their withdrawal in 2014.

Afghan police say at least 13 are dead after an infiltrator allowed militants into a police station.
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Blood tests spot ovarian cancer early

  • A blood test every four months could help women at high-risk of ovarian cancer find tumours early, say doctors.
  • Without screening, the only other option would be to keep an eye out for symptoms including:

    About two in every 100 women will develop ovarian cancer at some point in their life.

  • While screening does detect cancer, tumours are far less likely to develop in the first place if women have surgery.
  • Annwen Jones, the chief executive of Target Ovarian Cancer, said: “An effective screening programme for women at high risk of ovarian cancer due to family history would potentially have a major impact on mortality and survival from this disease.

  • [But] it is still uncertain whether detecting ovarian cancer by screening increases the chance of a woman surviving the disease overall.

There is no screening programme for the disease, so patients say it would be of “enormous benefit”.
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BBC Radio 4

  • Stephen Fry openly uses his own experience of mental ill health to consider the ever-changing way in which what’s commonly called madness is talked and written about.
  • But our dissociation of madness seems to downgrade its seriousness.
  • Comedians channel madness, real and metaphorical.
  • Even an innocent game of Krazy golf borrows from the looney lexicon.
  • Jess Thom is a writer and comedian and the founder of Tourettes Heroes.

Stephen Fry probes the Krazy language of madness. With Jo Brand.
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General Says U.S. Wants to Resume Major Military Exercise With Egypt

  • CAIRO — The top commander of American military operations in the Middle East said during a visit here on Sunday that the United States wanted to resume a major military exercise with Egypt that President Barack Obama canceled in 2013 to protest the killings of hundreds of civilian protesters.
  • The delivery of those systems by Mr. Obama was suspended in 2013 after the Egyptian military ousted Mohamed Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically elected president and a leader of the Muslim Brotherhood.
  • Though the resumption of Bright Star would send a loud signal that America is preparing to resume its relationship at the pre-2013 level, Egypt’s main goal is still the resumption of a military financing program that allows it to finance military purchases worth billions of dollars, by leveraging expected future inflows of American military aid.
  • Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham, both Republicans, have been sharply critical of Mr. Sisi’s continuing crackdown on civil society, in particular a proposed law that would make it nearly impossible for many foreign aid organizations to work in Egypt.
  • In December, Mr. McCain and Mr. Graham said in a joint statement that if the “draconian” law was passed, they would seek to introduce new restrictions on American aid to Egypt.

CAIRO — The top commander of American military operations in the Middle East said during a visit here on Sunday that the United States wanted to resume a major military exercise with Egypt that President Barack Obama canceled in 2013 to protest the killings of hundreds of civilian protesters.
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