Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Emmanuelle Charpentier helped pioneer Crispr, and she continues to be driven by science

  • STORAGE Researchers in the 1980s noticed that bacteria had small blocks of palindromic DNA repeated many times, with nonrepeated spacers of DNA stored in between.
  • Or a snippet of different DNA can be inserted to fill the gap, effectively editing the DNA sequence.
  • EDITING Researchers are learning how to use synthetic RNA sequences to control the cutting of any piece of DNA they choose.
  • An enzyme and a second piece of RNA latch on, forming a structure that will bind to strands of DNA that match the spacer’s sequence.
  • The spacers match pieces of DNA from viral invaders that bacteria or their ancestors have faced before.

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@NYTScience: “Emmanuelle Charpentier helped pioneer Crispr, and she continues to be driven by science”


One of the scientists credited with starting the gene editing revolution discusses her landmark discovery and how science has driven her.


Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr