A tumor donation yields answers for a devastating form of childhood cancer

A tumor donation yields answers for a devastating form of childhood cancer:

  • During Jennifer’s illness, Libby and her husband, Tony Kranz, heard about the work of Stanford pediatric neurooncologist Michelle Monje, MD, PhD, who studies donated DIPG tumor tissue to understand how its biology might be targeted with new treatments.
  • The Stanford team made the arrangements, and Libby also asked Monje to try to figure out how Jennifer’s tumor had spread so fast.
  • As Jennifer’s did, these tumors tend to spread to a brain region called the lateral ventricle subventricular zone, an area where new nerve cells can grow throughout life.
  • The new research also received funding from several other organizations that support childhood cancer research, including the Childhood Brain Tumor Foundation, the McKenna Claire Foundation and the Lyla Nsouli Foundation.)
  • Previously: Moving toward multi-pronged treatment for the worst childhood brain tumor, A look at scientists’ efforts to conquer a deadly brain tumor and Stanford brain tumor research featured on “Bay Area Proud”

    Photo of Jennifer Kranz courtesy of the Kranz family

In October 2013, on her 6th birthday, Jennifer Kranz was diagnosed with an incurable brain tumor. “That was the day we found out she likely wouldn’t make it
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