Emotional toll of diabetes ‘needs more recognition’

  • Image copyright – Getty Images – – – – Many people living with diabetes are struggling with related emotional problems – an issue that needs support and recognition, a charity says.Diabetes UK surveyed 8,500 people about diabetes and how it affected their daily life.Three in five said their condition made…
  • “Life-changingThe number of people diagnosed with diabetes – type 1 and type 2 – is on the rise.
  • According to Diabetes UK, about 700 people are diagnosed every day.And it’s a life-changing diagnosis.Those affected often have to check their blood sugars up to 10 times a day and plan their meal breaks – and what they will be eating – factoring in any exercise they may be doing….
  • It is usually seen in adults and is often associated with obesity – It is important to keep blood sugar under control to prevent health complications – Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include – feeling very thirsty, passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night and feeling very tired…
  • “We want to see a system where specialist support – from people who understand diabetes – is made available to those who need it.

Living with diabetes can lead to significant emotional problems, a survey finds.
Continue reading “Emotional toll of diabetes ‘needs more recognition’”

Beware potential signs of pancreatic cancer

  • Image copyright – Nikki Davies – – – – – Image caption – – Nikki is having chemotherapy to help prevent the cancer from returning – – – – One in three adults might ignore potential symptoms of pancreatic cancer, according to a charity.
  • Stomach ache, indigestion, unexplained weight loss and faeces that float rather than sink in the lavatory can be warning signs of the potentially deadly disease, says Pancreatic Cancer UK.
  • “I didn’t know anything about pancreatic cancer before my diagnosis, and I certainly wouldn’t have known what the symptoms were.
  • Image copyright – Getty Images – – – – – Image caption – – Hollywood actor Patrick Swayze died from advanced pancreatic cancer aged 57 – – – – This is in large part due to most patients being diagnosed at a late stage, when treatment options are very limited,…
  • “Common symptoms of pancreatic cancer include: – stomach and back ache – unexplained weight loss – indigestion – changes to bowel habits, including floating faeces – Other symptoms include: – loss of appetite – jaundice (yellow skin or eyes or itchy skin) – feeling and being sick – difficulty swallowing…

One in three adults might dismiss potential symptoms of this all-too-often deadly disease, say experts.
Continue reading “Beware potential signs of pancreatic cancer”

Beware potential signs of pancreatic cancer

  • Image copyright – Nikki Davies – – – – – Image caption – – Nikki is having chemotherapy to help prevent the cancer from returning – – – – One in three adults would ignore potential symptoms of pancreatic cancer, according to a charity.
  • Stomach ache, indigestion, unexplained weight loss and faeces that float rather than sink in the lavatory can be warning signs of the potentially deadly disease, says Pancreatic Cancer UK.
  • “I didn’t know anything about pancreatic cancer before my diagnosis, and I certainly wouldn’t have known what the symptoms were.
  • Image copyright – Getty Images – – – – – Image caption – – Hollywood actor Patrick Swayze died from advanced pancreatic cancer aged 57 – – – – This is in large part due to most patients being diagnosed at a late stage, when treatment options are very limited,…
  • “Common symptoms of pancreatic cancer include: – stomach and back ache – unexplained weight loss – indigestion – changes to bowel habits, including floating faeces – Other symptoms include: – loss of appetite – jaundice (yellow skin or eyes or itchy skin) – feeling and being sick – difficulty swallowing…

One in three adults would dismiss potential symptoms of this all-too-often deadly disease, say experts.
Continue reading “Beware potential signs of pancreatic cancer”

Breast cancer helpline founder paid herself £31k

Breast cancer charity given warning over its finances:

  • Image caption

    Wendy Watson founded a helpline for people seeking advice on breast cancer and its treatment

    A national breast cancer charity is being investigated after its founder paid herself £31,000, in breach of charity law.Wendy Watson, who launched the National Hereditary Breast Cancer Helpline in 1996, has resigned as a trustee.

  • Mrs Watson, of Derbyshire, founded the charity four years after she became the first woman in the UK to have a pre-emptive mastectomy.
  • Image copyright
    Google

    Image caption

    The organisation runs a network of charity shops around the country

    The charity was set up to raise awareness and fund a phoneline where people can speak to Mrs Watson for support and advice.By 2012, it was raising almost £1m a year from charity shops in Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Greater Manchester, Humberside and London.

  • Image copyright
    Reuters

    Image caption

    Gina Miller wants charities to have to spend at least 65% of income on charitable activities

    It is the first time the commission has issued an official warning under new powers handed down by the government.It also raised concerns about the organisation’s record keeping and “improperly delegating” management of the charity.The official warning was issued after points raised in a previous inspection last year were not addressed.

  • “Neither Ms Watson nor the charity were aware that this was inappropriate until they were informed by the Charity Commission, at which point Ms Watson immediately resigned as a trustee and continued to work without payment.

Wendy Watson, who was awarded an MBE in 2012, has resigned as a charity trustee over the “error”.
Continue reading “Breast cancer helpline founder paid herself £31k”

Breast cancer helpline founder paid herself £31k

  • Image caption

    Wendy Watson founded a helpline for people seeking advice on breast cancer and its treatment

    A national breast cancer charity is being investigated after its founder paid herself £31,000 in breach of charity law.Wendy Watson MBE, who launched National Hereditary Breast Cancer Helpline in 1996, has resigned as a trustee.

  • Image copyright
    Google

    Image caption

    The organisation runs a network of charity shops around the country

    The charity was set up to raise awareness and fund a phone line where people can speak to Mrs Watson for support and advice.By 2012, it was raising almost £1m per year from charity shops in Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Greater Manchester, Humberside and London.

  • Mrs Watson, who was given an MBE for services to people with breast cancer, paid herself the sum over the 2014-15 financial year.Trustees cannot be paid without permission from the Charity Commission, which regulates registered charities in England and Wales.
  • Image copyright
    Reuters

    Image caption

    Gina Miller wants charities to have to spend at least 65% of income on charitable activities

    It is the first time the commission has issued an official warning under new powers handed down by the government.It also raised concerns about the organisation’s record keeping and “improperly delegating” management of the charity.The official warning was issued after points raised in a previous inspection last year were not addressed.

  • “Neither Ms Watson nor the charity were aware that this was inappropriate until they were informed by the Charity Commission, at which point Ms Watson immediately resigned as a trustee and continued to work without payment.

Wendy Watson MBE has resigned as a trustee of National Hereditary Breast Cancer Helpline.
Continue reading “Breast cancer helpline founder paid herself £31k”

Kidney cancer drug approved for NHS use in England

  • Image copyright
    Sallyann Allenby

    Image caption

    Sallyann says the new drug is another option to treat her kidney cancer

    A drug which could prolong life for people with advanced kidney cancer has been approved for use on the NHS in England and Wales.Cabozantinib has the potential to switch off tumours in some patients and could give them many months of good-quality life, doctors said.Kidney cancer is the seventh most common cancer in the UK with around 12,000 new cases every year.The drug has already been approved for use in Scotland.A charity, Kidney Research UK, said treatment options for kidney cancer were limited and the newly-approved drug would offer patients “more hope and more time with their loved ones”.

  • ‘Another hope’Sallyann Allenby, 61, from Surrey is being treated for renal cell carcinoma – the most common type of kidney cancer – at Guy’s Hospital in London.She had a kidney removed in 2013 after finding blood in her urine on holiday and then collapsing on the flight home.Sallyann has tried several different treatments, one of which gave her unpleasant side-effects, and she has also participated in a clinical trial which did not work for her.In July, she began another new treatment and said cabozantinib gave her another option.
  • “This is really another hope for people like me, it’s something else to look forward to…”It’s bad enough having the cancer, but if you know there’s something else you can try then that keeps you going.
  • “Silencing tumoursIn trials, the drug was shown to be useful in patients whose kidney cancer had spread around the body and had become resistant to other treatments.The way cabozantinib works means it can target molecules on drug-resistant cancer cells, stopping the tumours or at least silencing them for a while.It works very differently to chemotherapy drugs and also immunotherapy drugs such as nivolumab, which is approved to treat advanced kidney cancer on the NHS.Nivolumab harnesses the power of the patient’s own immune system to destroy their cancer cells.Symptoms of kidney cancer can include blood in the urine, persistent pain in the side of the body just below the ribs and a lump or swelling in the kidney area.
  • If it’s caught early, kidney cancer can often be cured but a delay in diagnosis means a cure is less likely.A spokesman from Kidney Research UK said: “We are pleased to see cabozantinib has been approved by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, offering patients with renal cell carcinoma an increased chance of improved progression-free survival, compared to the standard therapy.”

It has the potential to stop drug-resistant tumours in some advanced patients.
Continue reading “Kidney cancer drug approved for NHS use in England”

Obesity caused 5,000 bowel cancer cases over 10 years, says charity

  • Image copyright
    Getty Images

    Image caption

    Obesity is linked to 13 types of cancer

    Almost 5,000 cases of bowel cancer in Scotland over the last decade have been caused by obesity, according to a leading charity.

  • There are around 3,800 cases of bowel cancer diagnosed in Scotland each year and about 1,600 people die from the disease annually.Obesity is linked to 13 types of cancer and Cancer Research UK said resistance to insulin, a hormone important in the breakdown of food, is one likely explanation.
  • Image copyright
    Getty Images

    Image caption

    About 1,600 people a year in Scotland die due to bowel cancer

    Scientists have found high levels of insulin in the body causes cells to divide more rapidly, raising the likelihood of the cells changing and leading to cancer.Cancer Research UK has warned the proportion of bowel cancer cases caused by obesity is on the increase as more of the population becomes overweight.It claimed shoppers were “bombarded” by offers encouraging them to stock up with food that leads to weight gain.

  • ‘Effective actions’Prof Linda Bauld, Cancer Research UK’s cancer prevention expert based at the University of Stirling, said: “It is a huge worry to see so many bowel cancer cases being caused by excess weight, and to see that proportion rising as more of the population becomes overweight or obese.
  • “Cancer Research UK believes restricting multi-buy offers on unhealthy foods and drinks would go a long way to improving the health of the nation.

Cancer Research UK wants restrictions on promotions and multi-buy offers on unhealthy foods and drinks.
Continue reading “Obesity caused 5,000 bowel cancer cases over 10 years, says charity”

Essex Live: News from around the county

BGT's Harry Gardener praised by Alzheimer charity

  • If you watched Britain’s Got Talent at the weekend you will have seen a Chelmsford teenager getting a standing ovation for his singing performance.Harry Gardner, 16, sang Not Alone, a song he wrote about his nan Maureen McGuinness who had dementia.
  • She died from the disease in April, shortly after his audition.The teenager has now been been praised by Alzheimer’s Research UK for the work he’s done to raise awareness of the condition.Last year, the song went viral for the charity and helped raise £8,000.
  • Following his audition, judge Simon Cowell said he would remember it because it was “very genuine” and “absolutely showed your talent as a song writer”.
  • “Last year Harry was made a Champion of Alzheimer’s Research UK, an accolade given to those who have gone “above and beyond” to raise funds and awareness for the charity.The charity’s director, Tim Parry, said they were “thrilled” to see him on Britain’s Got Talent.
  • “Harry is an inspiration to young people and we’ve been blown away by his commitment to support the charity in honour of his nan,” he said.

If you watched Britain’s Got Talent at the weekend you will have seen a Chelmsford teenager getting a standing ovation for his singing performance.
Continue reading “Essex Live: News from around the county”

Get Inspired: Free exercise packs for young visually impaired children in Scotland

Free exercise packs for young visually impaired children in Scotland



#GetInspired

  • “British Blind Sport knows what a difference playing sport can make to a blind or VI child’s life.
  • “The First Steps pack will often give visually impaired children their first opportunity to try sport or physical activity specifically adapted to them,” says British Blind Sport chief executive Alaina MacGregor.
  • “Put simply, First Steps will empower young visually impaired children and their families to have a healthier, more active and fun lifestyle.”
  • British Blind Sport has launched an new initiative supported by Scottish Disability Sport to help visually impaired children between the ages of five and 15 participate in a more active and fun lifestyle.
  • Get Inspired: Free exercise packs for young visually impaired children in Scotland

Read the full article, click here.


@bbcgetinspired: “Free exercise packs for young visually impaired children in Scotland

#GetInspired”


British Blind Sport releases First Steps activity packs to build confidence for visually impaired children in Scotland.


Get Inspired: Free exercise packs for young visually impaired children in Scotland

More people caring for someone with cancer

  • Last week, a charity said the number of people in their 80s or older who are relied on as carers had soared in the last seven years.
  • The Department of Health is consulting on how it can improve support for carers.
  • Fran Woodard, of Macmillan Cancer Support, said there was an urgent need to ensure the right support was in place for people caring for loved ones with cancer.
  • The estimated number of those carers in 2016 was 1,416,000 compared with 1,080,000 in 2011.
  • ‘Hidden army’ of carers in their 80s, says Age UK

Read the full article, click here.


@BBCNews: “More people caring for someone with cancer – survey”


The number of people caring for someone with cancer in the UK has risen to almost 1.5 million, according to a cancer charity.


More people caring for someone with cancer