How Exercise Could Help You Learn a New Language

How Exercise Could Help You Learn a New Language

  • So for the new study, which was published recently in PLOS One, researchers in China and Italy decided to home in on language learning and the adult brain.
  • Specifically, the students would ride exercise bikes at a gentle pace (about 60 percent of their maximum aerobic capacity) beginning 20 minutes before the start of the lessons and continuing throughout the 15 minutes or so of instruction.
  • When the researchers asked the students to return to the lab for a final round of testing a month after the lessons — without practicing in the meantime — the cyclists remembered words and understood them in sentences more accurately than did the students who had not moved.
  • This study involved college students performing relatively light exercise, though, and cannot tell us whether other people completing other types of exercise would achieve the same results.
  • But many past studies have shown that exercise prompts the release of multiple neurochemicals in the brain that increase the number of new brain cells and the connections between neurons, Dr. Sulpizio says.

Working out during a language class amplifies an adult’s ability to memorize, retain and understand new vocabulary.
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Official Harvard Guide: Gender Can ‘Change From Day to Day’

  • The office of BGLTQ Student Life at Harvard University has released a guide that says for some people, gender identity can “change from day to day.”
  • The school-sponsored flier, which was distributed to students on the elite Ivy League campus, said for some “gender is fluid and changing,” and it “can be affirmed and/or expressed in many ways.”
  • On “Fox & Friends Weekend” this morning, conservative millennial blogger Allie Stuckey said Harvard is supposed to be a bastion of intelligent and productive discourse, and this guide stands in direct opposition to that.
  • As for the controversy surrounding Ann Coulter’s speech at the University of California-Berkeley, Stuckey said the issue isn’t about the university providing security for a conservative guest speaker, but why they should even have to.
  • “The university should be preventing the violence from happening,” Stuckey said.

The office of BGLTQ Student Life at Harvard University has released a guide that says for some people, gender identity can “change from day to day.”
Continue reading “Official Harvard Guide: Gender Can ‘Change From Day to Day’”

Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Emmanuelle Charpentier discusses her life as a co-discoverer of CRISPR with @nytimes

  • STORAGE Researchers in the 1980s noticed that bacteria had small blocks of palindromic DNA repeated many times, with nonrepeated spacers of DNA stored in between.
  • Or a snippet of different DNA can be inserted to fill the gap, effectively editing the DNA sequence.
  • EDITING Researchers are learning how to use synthetic RNA sequences to control the cutting of any piece of DNA they choose.
  • An enzyme and a second piece of RNA latch on, forming a structure that will bind to strands of DNA that match the spacer’s sequence.
  • The spacers match pieces of DNA from viral invaders that bacteria or their ancestors have faced before.

Read the full article, click here.


@GeneticsGSA: “Emmanuelle Charpentier discusses her life as a co-discoverer of CRISPR with @nytimes”


One of the scientists credited with starting the gene editing revolution discusses her landmark discovery and how science has driven her.


Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Before she became a gene editing pioneer, Emmanuelle Charpentier was a scientific nomad

  • STORAGE Researchers in the 1980s noticed that bacteria had small blocks of palindromic DNA repeated many times, with nonrepeated spacers of DNA stored in between.
  • Or a snippet of different DNA can be inserted to fill the gap, effectively editing the DNA sequence.
  • EDITING Researchers are learning how to use synthetic RNA sequences to control the cutting of any piece of DNA they choose.
  • An enzyme and a second piece of RNA latch on, forming a structure that will bind to strands of DNA that match the spacer’s sequence.
  • The spacers match pieces of DNA from viral invaders that bacteria or their ancestors have faced before.

Read the full article, click here.


@NYTScience: “Before she became a gene editing pioneer, Emmanuelle Charpentier was a scientific nomad”


One of the scientists credited with starting the gene editing revolution discusses her landmark discovery and how science has driven her.


Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Emmanuelle Charpentier helped pioneer Crispr, and she continues to be driven by science

  • STORAGE Researchers in the 1980s noticed that bacteria had small blocks of palindromic DNA repeated many times, with nonrepeated spacers of DNA stored in between.
  • Or a snippet of different DNA can be inserted to fill the gap, effectively editing the DNA sequence.
  • EDITING Researchers are learning how to use synthetic RNA sequences to control the cutting of any piece of DNA they choose.
  • An enzyme and a second piece of RNA latch on, forming a structure that will bind to strands of DNA that match the spacer’s sequence.
  • The spacers match pieces of DNA from viral invaders that bacteria or their ancestors have faced before.

Read the full article, click here.


@NYTScience: “Emmanuelle Charpentier helped pioneer Crispr, and she continues to be driven by science”


One of the scientists credited with starting the gene editing revolution discusses her landmark discovery and how science has driven her.


Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr

Emmanuelle Charpentier helped discover Crispr. Now she's launching two genetics companies.

  • STORAGE Researchers in the 1980s noticed that bacteria had small blocks of palindromic DNA repeated many times, with nonrepeated spacers of DNA stored in between.
  • Or a snippet of different DNA can be inserted to fill the gap, effectively editing the DNA sequence.
  • EDITING Researchers are learning how to use synthetic RNA sequences to control the cutting of any piece of DNA they choose.
  • An enzyme and a second piece of RNA latch on, forming a structure that will bind to strands of DNA that match the spacer’s sequence.
  • The spacers match pieces of DNA from viral invaders that bacteria or their ancestors have faced before.

Read the full article, click here.


@NYTScience: “Emmanuelle Charpentier helped discover Crispr. Now she’s launching two genetics companies.”


One of the scientists credited with starting the gene editing revolution discusses her landmark discovery and how science has driven her.


Emmanuelle Charpentier’s Still-Busy Life After Crispr